Do you have an artistic blind spot? Exploring the (creative) undiscovered country

Watercolor, pencil, and emotional baggage on 145# paper

But that the dread of something after death, The undiscovered country, from whose bourn No traveler returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus Conscience does make Cowards of us all….
Hamlet

I’ve discovered that I have at least one, and maybe several, creative blind spots.

By “blind spots” I mean artistic taboos: things that I tend to avoid expressing in my art, either because I just don’t think about them or more likely, I’m subconsciously nervous about exploring.

Sure, I’ve made art about despair and rage and fantasy and simple beauty — for me, those things are relatively easy. But what about envy or fear or passion?

Do you have some creative blind spots, or things you avoid in your art?

How about perfectionism, procrastination, vanity, inner critics, outer critics, Impostor Syndrome? Joy?

What might making something that explores your artistic taboos feel like?

Hamlet’s Undiscovered Country is death. For us creative types, visiting our Undiscovered Country feels a bit like an artistic death — death of the familiar, the easy, the comfortable.

What will we find when we fling ourselves into that fanged darkness? Is it failure or beauty or rejection or incompetence or a Truth-so-bright-it-Hurts?

Let’s find out. Together.

I double-dog dare you to step into your artistic Undiscovered Country. We can hold hands, if you like.

I’ll even go first.


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